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30

Jul

What’s with the sense of entitlement?
Guess where every single link in the screenshot above leads to… Port’s self-hocking website. Here’s the point.

Maybe it’s just me but recently I’ve noticed a trend amongst the C-list celebs. Specifically, I’m choosing to use the twitterverse as my primary example. I’ve noticed this odd prerogative, this strange air of stardom that I find somewhat undeserving. I hate to call people out, especially people I somewhat like, but I feel that this specific argument calls for a specific target. I’m choosing Whitney Port.
I follow Whitney on twitter primarily because I liked the character I saw on The Hills. The City is a different story altogether but that actually ties nicely into my point. I read this girl’s tweets daily as the frequently pop up on my feed and I can’t help but think to myself, “You’re not a star, yet. You’re just a celebrity. You’re undeserving of said entitlement and you should use this small platform of fame that you have to the best of your ability. Start speaking like a human being, please.” I hate that most tweets that seem honest and real link directly to her personal website. Why can’t you link to plain twitpics like everyone else? Also, I loathe the fact that she constantly asks her true fans for opinions or advice and never replies back. That’s a farce and people can tell.

I should use direct examples:
"Does this make us look nerdy or cute? [gratuitous link to own website littered with links selling her Whitney Eve clothing line] haha”
"Watch this video message all the way from Spain [gratuitous link to own website littered with links selling her Whitney Eve clothing line]”
"@taylorswift13 I hope you are loving the Whitney Eve goodies! Have a great shoot! xoxo"
Get it?

Anyway, I chose to make an example of Port because of how The City unfolded this season, as well. I loved watching Olivia Palermo refuse to acknowledge the existence of Port’s clothing line and its depicted rise to notoriety. Any viewer who takes a second to think realizes that the power of MTV and the production of the show is what forces Whitney Eve into the spotlight. I loved reading response tweets from viewers regarding the episodes as they aired complaining about Olivia and her lack of enthusiasm towards the line. Is this not the girl that Whitney heckled for two seasons behind the scenes?

[gratuitous screenshot of love of my life, Olivia Palermo]
I’m not saying Whitney is a terrible designer or that she’s undeserving. As I’ve said previously, I’m a fan of Port’s and I think she has a lot of potential. In fact, I actually bought my sister one of her pieces as a christmas gift and she loves it. Also, I could be using a bad example in Port. Maybe it’s just convenient to organize photos or posts on a blog that also conveniently hocks your brand. 
Lastly, I’ll say this. Be good to your fans. Talk to them like equals and not like idiots. I understand that when you’re a few rungs down on the ladder of fame you have to sell your name brand but you would benefit so much from taking notes on celebrities like Lady Gaga who consider their fans friends. I’ll also say this. I somewhat chose Whitney as an example because I do like her and I wish her the best, hence why I chose to link frequently to her self-hocking promotional blog. 
PS: If you want to check out a real, true blue example of what I’m talking about… Audrina is so much worse. 

What’s with the sense of entitlement?

Guess where every single link in the screenshot above leads to… Port’s self-hocking website. Here’s the point.

Maybe it’s just me but recently I’ve noticed a trend amongst the C-list celebs. Specifically, I’m choosing to use the twitterverse as my primary example. I’ve noticed this odd prerogative, this strange air of stardom that I find somewhat undeserving. I hate to call people out, especially people I somewhat like, but I feel that this specific argument calls for a specific target. I’m choosing Whitney Port.

I follow Whitney on twitter primarily because I liked the character I saw on The Hills. The City is a different story altogether but that actually ties nicely into my point. I read this girl’s tweets daily as the frequently pop up on my feed and I can’t help but think to myself, “You’re not a star, yet. You’re just a celebrity. You’re undeserving of said entitlement and you should use this small platform of fame that you have to the best of your ability. Start speaking like a human being, please.” I hate that most tweets that seem honest and real link directly to her personal website. Why can’t you link to plain twitpics like everyone else? Also, I loathe the fact that she constantly asks her true fans for opinions or advice and never replies back. That’s a farce and people can tell.

I should use direct examples:

"Does this make us look nerdy or cute? [gratuitous link to own website littered with links selling her Whitney Eve clothing line] haha”

"Watch this video message all the way from Spain [gratuitous link to own website littered with links selling her Whitney Eve clothing line]”

"@taylorswift13 I hope you are loving the Whitney Eve goodies! Have a great shoot! xoxo"

Get it?

Anyway, I chose to make an example of Port because of how The City unfolded this season, as well. I loved watching Olivia Palermo refuse to acknowledge the existence of Port’s clothing line and its depicted rise to notoriety. Any viewer who takes a second to think realizes that the power of MTV and the production of the show is what forces Whitney Eve into the spotlight. I loved reading response tweets from viewers regarding the episodes as they aired complaining about Olivia and her lack of enthusiasm towards the line. Is this not the girl that Whitney heckled for two seasons behind the scenes?

[gratuitous screenshot of love of my life, Olivia Palermo]

I’m not saying Whitney is a terrible designer or that she’s undeserving. As I’ve said previously, I’m a fan of Port’s and I think she has a lot of potential. In fact, I actually bought my sister one of her pieces as a christmas gift and she loves it. Also, I could be using a bad example in Port. Maybe it’s just convenient to organize photos or posts on a blog that also conveniently hocks your brand. 

Lastly, I’ll say this. Be good to your fans. Talk to them like equals and not like idiots. I understand that when you’re a few rungs down on the ladder of fame you have to sell your name brand but you would benefit so much from taking notes on celebrities like Lady Gaga who consider their fans friends. I’ll also say this. I somewhat chose Whitney as an example because I do like her and I wish her the best, hence why I chose to link frequently to her self-hocking promotional blog

PS: If you want to check out a real, true blue example of what I’m talking about… Audrina is so much worse. 


09

May

R

egarding why shows like Gossip Girl and The Hills are so popular.


I’ve been doing a lot of thinking surrounding the fame fascination. Not that this entire blog isn’t dedicated to that but more specifically so, I’ve been considering why it is that the general public is so infatuated with celebrity. In other words, I’ve been trying to think in the reverse. Instead of pondering about what celebrities do with their platform, and what kind of power they hold in owning said platform, I’ve been thinking about what gives them the platform in the first place.

I’ve come to the conclusion that the Hollywood dream is actually not as appealing from a fame and fortune standpoint. I think young people are recognizing the pitfalls of celebrity via the missteps of Lindsay Lohan or Heidi Montag, for example. I think more so, the fascination is subconscious.

I believe that when a tween watches a show catered to their demographic, like Gossip Girl, there is more to the captivation than simply wishing they could be Blake Lively, Leighton Meester, or Chace Crawford. In actuality, I think they’re wishing they could live a little more like Serena, Blair, or Nate. I give young people a lot of credit, and I think kids are smarter than adults credit them to be. A normal teenager doesn’t do as much pondering on the subject as say I do, though, and so I think the line is somewhat blurred between actor and character. I’m not going to knock the viewer but what I will say is that maybe, for some, the best, and most logical, way to turn “pining for a more interesting life” into “living a more interesting life” is to try to break into Hollywood as an aspiring actor.

On the surface it’s, “if I get a role on Gossip Girl, I’ll be a celebrity.” Subconsciously the thought is, “if i get a role on Gossip Girl, I will live a life of excitement, adventure, wealth, romance, etc… as my character. My life will be perfect because, surrounded by chaos and drama, I’ll fall in love with someone who actually cares... like my character.”

but they’ll probably never realize that.